(hiatus)

I was moving all of my furniture out of my room so that the carpet cleaners my landlord hired can do their job. Part of my task involved shifting all of my books around in piles.

As I remembered the stories I own I also remembered how many I have not yet read, despite owning them for years. I remember reading how a person can presumably become an international expert in their field in seven years if they spend one hour a day reading literature related to their field. I remember my need to some mental space.

So I will not be on any social media for the month of August, and will generally try to avoid the internet in general.

I’ve got some books to read.

halftheskymovement:

Street harassment is a frightening and disempowering reality for many women and girls. From catcalls, to flashing, to inappropriate touching, many women are forced to navigate an “obstacle course of sexual menace” — as coined by The Daily Show — on a regular, if not daily, basis.

One woman, Lindsey from Minnesota, is determined to change that. She has created Cards Against Harassment, an online resource with printable PDFs of cards women can hand out to street harassers. The cards are brief and to the point, and provide a method for women to address the issue of verbal street harassment in a hopefully educational way.

"If you do not feel safe confronting street harassment, you should not put yourself at risk," Lindsey states on her FAQs page. “However, for many women, silence is frustrating and its own form of victimization.”

Reblogged from halftheskymovement

I’m Sorry For Coining the Phrase “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” | Nathan Rabin

thatlitsite:

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When I coined the term “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” in an essay about the movie “Elizabethtown” in 2007, I never could have imagined how that phrase would explode. Describing the film’s adorably daffy love interest played by Kirsten Dunst, I defined the MPDG as a fantasy figure who “exists solely in the fevered imaginations of sensitive writer-directors to teach broodingly soulful young men to embrace life and its infinite mysteries and adventures.”

That day in 2007, I remember watching “Elizabethtown” and being distracted by the preposterousness of its heroine, Claire. Dunst’s psychotically bubbly stewardess seemed to belong in some magical, otherworldly realm — hence the “pixie” — offering up her phone number to strangers and drawing whimsical maps to help her man find his way. And as Dunst cavorted across the screen, I thought also of Natalie Portman in “Garden State,” a similarly carefree nymphet who is the accessory to Zach Braff’s character development. It’s an archetype, I realized, that taps into a particular male fantasy: of being saved from depression and ennui by a fantasy woman who sweeps in like a glittery breeze to save you from yourself, then disappears once her work is done.

When I hit “publish” on that piece, the first entry in a column I called “My Year of Flops,” I was pretty proud of myself. I felt as if I had tapped into something that had been a part of our culture for a long time and given it a catchy, descriptive name — a name with what Malcolm Gladwell might call “stickiness.”

But I should clarify a few things here. The trope of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl is a fundamentally sexist one, since it makes women seem less like autonomous, independent entities than appealing props to help mopey, sad white men self-actualize. Within that context, the phrase was useful precisely because, while still fairly flexible, it also benefited from a certain specificity. Claire was an unusually pure example of a Manic Pixie Dream Girl — a fancifully if thinly conceived flibbertigibbet who has no reason to exist except to cheer up one miserable guy.

The response to my review was pretty positive but relatively sleepy. The A.V. Club was a whole lot smaller back then and the phrase didn’t really gain traction until a year later, when my colleague Tasha Robinson proposed doing a list of Manic Pixie Dream Girls for the “Inventory” feature of our site. The list, published in 2008, was titled “16 films featuring Manic Pixie Dream Girls,” and featured, along with Dunst and Portman, Diane Keaton in “Annie Hall” and Audrey Hepburn in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”

I remember thinking, even back then, that a whole list of Manic Pixie Dream Girls might be stretching the conceit too far. The archetype of the free-spirited life-lover who cheers up a male sad-sack had existed in the culture for ages. But by giving an idea a name and a fuzzy definition, you apparently also give it power. And in my case, that power spun out of control.

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To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket, safe, dark, motionless, airless, it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable.
C.S. Lewis, The Four Loves (via beautywillfindus)